Experience or Laziness?

The other day I was working on a block and it must have been my state of mind at the time but I decided to try something different. I was working on a project with lots of corner triangles (can’t post that yet) and usually I’d mark and pin my square pieces before piecing, I mean perfection is all that important right or not ;).  Well this time I tried a tip I’ve seen in a few places and even tried a couple of times on my own for accurate 1/4″ seam. I reached for my draping tape…if you’ve ever seen an episode of Project Runway then you know the one I’m talking about?

It’s those thin colorful tapes for draping on a body form…and why do I have this tape?…well I’m a huge fan of Project Runway and I was at one point all about fashion design, so I invested in notions and tools that seemed necessary at the time. I’m not doing any draping lately but it sure came in handy…ah where was I? Yes- I took out the tape and marked the ¼ point on my machine, aligned the diagonal point of my pieces to the marked line and stitched hoping to achieve the desired result.

IMG_20160207_134012[1]

Result…not so perfect seams but then again perfection is overrated *shhhh* I didn’t say that! I was probably too stuck on getting it right that I lost focus, not to worry “practice makes perfection”.

IMG_20160223_201534[1]

I have since been using this method and achieving better results however it can’t be compared to the result I get with my old method of marking and pinning. I have somehow convinced myself that this little imperfection doesn’t really affect the final block outcome and really it doesn’t – not in a way that makes the method totally unacceptable see block below:

IMG_20160223_220019[1]

In retrospect though have I gotten too lazy to go the long route or have I just gained more experience in Quilting that I can now confidently take some shortcuts? After all I get to be more efficient time wise, and every little time you save matters right?

On the other hand is it a worthy sacrifice, perfection for time efficiency?…I mean I don’t know yet, still trying it out. One thing I know for sure is that time taken to complete a project fades away when compared to the joy of a perfectly completed project. I’ve ripped out so many stitches and sighed so many times because of mistakes I didn’t know I was making but why not err on the side of caution than walk right into a trap right? Using this method, I’ve had to restitch several seams because they ended up curvy rather than straight and that caused me more trouble down the line trying to match my points.

On a final note, while I will continue to use this method because I believe I can perfect it in due time, I have resolved to stick to my old method for projects where perfection is absolutely necessary or where skipping the marking won’t really be saving me that much time. I am also reviewing my whole process to see areas where perfection is less important and other tips/shortcuts to better efficiency. I promise to keep you posted as I get along.

What are your thoughts, are there shortcuts/tips you have learnt over time for a more efficient piecing or more efficient process altogether? I’d like to read all about them so kindly comment below.

Thanks for stopping by and do have a great weekend ahead…until next time XX

Sola 🙂

P.S: The Quilting process series continues next week and we’ll be talking about the fun stuff…FABRICS!!!

 


2 thoughts on “Experience or Laziness?

  1. I think there is a balance you will find between “perfection” and effort. Some things I spend more time on because I know I am happier with the results. For example, for long seams (attaching rows of blocks, or attaching a border) I pin A LOT, like every 2″ or even less. The pinning takes far longer than the sewing. But I do it because my seam allowance is better for distance and stability. Some people would put a few pins in and call it ready to sew. And I’ve taken to marking the stitching line on almost all of my stitch-and-flip corners like on flying geese, because I am happier with how it turns out. But for half square triangles, I already have them cut and simply sew the regular seam. Another thing I do that takes an extra moment is I CHECK my sizes when assembling pieces, to make sure they really are turning out the right size. If they are a little too small or a little too big, it’s easy to adjust at the beginning instead of waiting and finding out a whole stack of blocks turned out wrong. Some people never check, and I would argue their work probably shows it. 🙂

    Your cushion is wonderful, such beautiful fabrics and you showed them off so well.

    Like

    1. Thanks a lot for your comment Melanie, it means a lot. I guess that’s the point I am right now, finding that balance between “perfection and effort” In my mind, it doesn’t matter how long it takes to get my blocks right because I must be happy with the result at the end of the day :). I never used to pin my strips for border or anything but I tried it one time and I was so happy with the result. In the long run, taking that time at the beginning to do all my due diligence and put in that extra effort certainly makes my life easier by the time the block comes together. At the same time though, I really need to let go of a little bit of “perfection” as I think time efficiency is just as important. That’s why I am reviewing to see other aspects where I can save time. Oh I used to be one of those people who hardly checks my sizes…hahahaha. Thanks for your compliment on the cushion, I’ve had that fabric for a while now and it just seems very fit for this purpose!

      Liked by 1 person

I love to hear from you...leave a reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.